UFC And Bodybuilding

Comparing Lifestyles: UFC And Bodybuilding.

On the surface, there might not seem to be parallels between UFC and competitive bodybuilding. Mixed martial artists are training to develop their bodies to bring the skill into the octagon that will enable them to pound an opponent into submission. As well, they must develop a physique and a will that can take and absorb punishment and persevere through significant pain as they contest bouts upon which money will be wagers across UFC betting canada sites.

You could say that the elite competitors in UFC are training to develop how to look out. In the case of the competitive bodybuilder, they are training to develop how they look.

That being said, there are some significant parallels in the two sporting pursuits and in fact there are some qualities of the life of an MMA star that can be put into effective use by a star competitor in competitive bodybuilding.

Discipline And Commitment

Each sport requires a unique brand of discipline and restraint. A long-term relationship with self-control will be vital to any success story in the octagon or on the bodybuilding stage.

That discipline comes into play during the daily workout regimen at the gym. There are going to be days when it’s easier than others to get yourself to the gym. And once there, it requires a one-of-a-kind level of courage and determination for the elite athletes in either of these disciplines to push onward through the inevitable pain and setbacks that will come during training for a major event.

Temptation will need to be discouraged and ultimately put aside. Yes that donut might look tasty but it won’t help one iota in competition. And as much as a night on the town with friends or binge watching the latest Netflix series looks like fun, it isn’t going to provide a level of satisfaction when you come up short in that next event.




Cutting Weight

If there’s one topic that both elite mixed martial artists and world-class bodybuilders can nod in agreement about, it’s the challenges and inherent dangers that can come from the need to cut weight for a competition.

No one has to explain to a top-level bodybuilder why they must cut weight, or how little enjoyment will be gained from this necessary evil of the competitive lifestyle.

To those bodybuilders not intimately familiar with the MMA way of life, it may come as a surprise to discover that they go through similar trials and tribulations when trying to make weight for an upcoming fight.

Like a top-notch bodybuilder, elite-level mixed martial artists will regularly find it necessary to cut as much as 10, perhaps even 12 kilos prior to a fight. It’s the reasons why they must do it that differ significantly.

A bodybuilder is dropping weight with one specific goal in mind – to appear on stage as shredded as they possibly can. Performance is not even an issue that enters into the equation.

For a UFC fighter, the weight must be cut in order to fight in a lighter class, but it needs to be done in a manner through which the fighter maintains their ability to perform inside the cage. Their power, strength and agility cannot be inhibited by the weight cut.

This is where bodybuilders can learn from the weight-cutting methods of top MMA stars.



It’s All About Nutrition

A prominent competitive bodybuilder remarked early in his career that success in the gym and in competition was about 80 percent due to proper nutrition. As he got older, he remarked that he was probably underestimating that number.

For MMA stars, the weight-cutting guru is former fighter and current nutrition expert George Lockhart. He gets fighters on a path to their desired weight and does so without the fighters putting their health, both in the short and long-term, in any jeopardy.

Lockhart starts fighters out with what he calls a pre-cut but what is in fact merely the adoption of a healthier lifestyle. He designs nutrition plans that fight each fighter.

The No. 1 facet to healthy weight cutting? Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.

“As little as 3% dehydration equates to a 30% decrease in performance,” Lockhart explained in Men’s Journal. “You’re starting to pull things from your major organs.”