RESEARCH: One egg per day will keep the doctor away

Is one egg per day enough for the extreme athlete?

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egg day doctor

RESEARCH: One egg per day will keep the doctor away.

The amount of eggs that a person can consume has been a controversial subject a number of years.

Different studies have resulted in contradicting results.

In the latest study published in the American Journal of Clinical, found that eating one egg per day did not increase one’s risk of heart disease. To ensure the results were accurate, researchers looked at the egg consumption of more than 146,000 people from 21 countries, and also looked at the cases of more than 31,000 people with heart disease.

Those who ate seven or fewer eggs per week did not have a higher chance of heart disease or mortality risk.




According to Mahshid Dehghan “Moderate egg intake, which is about one egg per day in most people, does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or mortality, even if people have a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes.”

Although eggs are an inexpensive source of essential nutrients, some guidelines have recommended limiting consumption to fewer than three eggs a week due to concerns they increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Previous studies on egg consumption and diseases have been contradictory, said Salim Yusuf, principal investigator of the study and director of PHRI.

“Moderate egg intake, which is about one egg per day in most people, does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease”

“This is because most of these studies were relatively small or moderate in size and did not include individuals from a large number of countries,” he said.


With all these results, will it change how many eggs an athlete or bodybuilder consumes?

Bodybuilders are known to consume a large amount of eggs each day.

It would be very interesting to find out the results of research done on a extreme athlete such as a bodybuilder or strongman.

If you do consume a large amount of eggs, it would be a safe bet to get your blood checked regularly.

Source:
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
McMaster University
Muscle & Fitness